A second crocodile has been killed for an autopsy after a 69-year-old fisherman went missing in central Queensland.

The reptile, measuring about three metres, was caught and euthanised by Department of Environment and Science officers near Hinchinbrook Island on Sunday night.

It’s comes after human remains were found inside a 4m-long animal caught on Saturday in Gayundah Creek near where the man went missing.

“Our thoughts are with the family at this difficult time,” the department said in a statement.

The man went fishing about 3pm on Thursday and was due back within an hour, but failed to return and his wife called police.

Officers found his upturned boat about 2.30am on Friday, with damage suggesting a crocodile attack.

Police conducted a search using boats and aircraft, drones and traps, and were helped by SES personnel.

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Searchers found human remains in the creek before finding the first crocodile.

Police said the man was an experienced boatie, but had no safety equipment with him other than his radio.

Premier Anastasia Palaszczuk says the man’s death is shocking.

“It’s an absolute tragedy, what happened to that man and can I pass on our condolences to his family. Absolutely horrific,” she told reporters.

It’s the third crocodile attack in Queensland this month, with two swimmers in Cairns and Weipa surviving their encounters.

The crocodiles involved were either killed or relocated to crocodile farms.

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Federal MP Bob Katter says the state’s reactive crocodile-management plan has cost a human life and put others at risk.

“We aren’t talking about a crocodile issue; we are talking about the value of human life,” he said.

“Once you lose the respect for one human you lose the respect for the life of every human.”

Ms Palaszczuk said the government’s $6 million crocodile awareness program needed to ensure people were aware of sightings and the dangers posed by the animals.

“The locals are aware, but I just think that we just need, if there are sightings, we need to make sure that the rest of the community knows where they are,” she said.

AAP

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